Youth converge in Ottawa for the 2019 STEAM Horizon Awards

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Ingenium - Canada's Museums of Science and Innovation

Five of Canada’s young, rising stars are headed to the nation’s capital this week for the 2019 STEAM Horizon Awards.

Now in its third year, the awards program honours youth, ages 16 to 18, who promote positive changes throughout their communities using science, technology, engineering, arts, and math (STEAM). Each of the five winners will receive a $25,000 prize towards post-secondary education.

The winners — who hail from diverse regions of Canada — will attend the STEAM Horizon Awards Ceremony at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum on April 25. The Ingenium Channel caught up with each of them, to ask how they felt when they first received notification of winning a STEAM Horizon Award.

Here’s what each of them had to say.

Jason Amri (Ancaster, Ontario)

“I was absolutely ecstatic when I found out I had won a STEAM Horizon award. I remember sitting in class and getting the email. With each word I read, my smile just kept growing. That night, I shared the amazing news with my mom. I was, and I am, so honoured to have received this award.”

Jason Amri stands in front of a waterfall.

Jason Amri at the Ancaster Old Mill, a historic flour mill near Hamilton, Ontario — which is known as the “City of Waterfalls.”

Tyra Cockney-Goose (Inuvik, Northwest Territories)

“I found out that I had won the STEAM Horizon award very early in the morning due to the time zone differences. I rubbed my eyes and looked over my phone, which was far too bright for such an ungodly time in the morning, but you can bet that once I read the email that I went from half asleep to completely awake in a matter of seconds. The first person I told was my mom, unfortunately though I think she had her phone off, so the first people who found out were my sisters and my dad."

Tyra Cockney-Goose skates on an ice road in her hometown of Inuvik, Northwest Territories.

Tyra Cockney-Goose skates on an ice road in her hometown of Inuvik, Northwest Territories.

Jonah Saemerow (Kamloops, British Columbia)

“I was on a family vacation on Vancouver Island when I found out that I had won a STEAM Horizon Award. I read the email three times before the shock faded and I started to get excited. The first person I told was my mom, and she was so happy and loud that she probably woke up half of the hotel that we were staying in.”

Jonah Saemerow overlooks the Thompson River in Kamloops, British Columbia.

Jonah Saemerow overlooks the Thompson River in Kamloops, British Columbia.

Waleed Sawan (London, Ontario)

"Winning the STEAM Horizon Award was a surreal feeling. I was excited, honoured, and thrilled that an esteemed group of judges had chosen me to receive this prestigious award. I immediately called my Dad to share the amazing news."

Waleed Sawan stands next to the Forks of the Thames River in his hometown of London, Ontario.

Waleed Sawan stands next to the Forks of the Thames River in his hometown of London, Ontario.

Jackson Weir (Saint John, New Brunswick)

“I was nothing short of overwhelmed – I could hardly believe it. After reading the first sentence of the offer email, I ran into the other room to tell all my friends and thank the person who helped me with the video portion of the application. One of my friends continued to read the email and found my status as a recipient is to be kept strictly confidential! They have been sworn to secrecy the last couple of weeks.”

Jackson Weir stands on a walking bridge that crosses the Saint John River in New Brunswick.

Jackson Weir stands on a walking bridge that crosses the Saint John River in New Brunswick. 

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Sonia Mendes

Sonia Mendes is the English Writer/Editor for Ingenium. She loves digging behind the scenes to tell the quirky, colourful stories of museum life and all things related to science and innovation.