Josie Gonzalez and the National Roundtable on the Environment

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Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21
Josie Gonzalez and the National Roundtable on the Environment

Josie Gonzalez is from the Philippines. She wanted to be a doctor, but her father thought that was not practical, so she became a Chemical Engineer and worked for the Forest Products Research Institute at the University of the Philippines before coming to Canada. She completed graduate studies in Forestry in the United States, and eventually came to Canada and worked with the federal Department of Agriculture and Forestry (and later Forintek when it was privatized). She also worked as an electron microscopist with a focus on wood identification, and was sometimes called upon to be an expert witness in cases involving murder and theft.  In 1988, she was invited to become a member of the Society for Canadian Women in Science and Technology. She participated in a national roundtable on the environment. Josie was interviewed with her husband Jess.

Josie Gonzalez studied  chemical engineering in the Philippines, and completed a Master’s degree in forestry in the United States. She came to Canada with her family in 1966, and worked with the Federal Department of Agriculture and Forestry (later Forintek) until her retirement. She is an expert in the micro-cellular structure of wood. She became a charter member of the National roundtable on the Environment in 1989 and travelled to various parts of the country for meetings, including the Yukon, where they visited the Windy Craggy Copper Mine by helicopter.

Josie Gonzalez, arrived from the Philippines, 1966. Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 [14.02.26JJG].

Clip Context: Josie Gonzalez studied chemical engineering in the Philippines, and completed a Master’s degree in forestry in the United States. She came to Canada with her family in 1966, and worked with the Federal Department of Agriculture and Forestry (later Forintek) until her retirement. She is an expert in the micro-cellular structure of wood. She became a charter member of the National roundtable on the Environment in 1989 and travelled to various parts of the country for meetings, including the Yukon, where they visited the Windy Craggy Copper Mine by helicopter.

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Pier 21

Pier 21 is a National Historic Site which was the gateway to Canada for one million immigrants between 1928 and 1971. It also served as the departure point for 500,000 Canadian Military personnel during the Second World War. Today, Pier 21 hosts the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21—Atlantic Canada’s only national museum!

https://pier21.ca/home/