Alan Efetha and Community-Driven Research

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Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21
Alan Efetha and Community-Driven Research

Alan Efetha grew up in a rural, agricultural area in Kenya. His father was a welder and a mechanic. Alan studied soil hydrology and crops in Canada (undergraduate and graduate degrees), and works for the Alberta provincial Department of Agriculture in irrigation-related issues. In the interview, he talks about Polish, Ukrainian and Russian farmers in Saskatchewan offering him work, and teaching him to drive a hydrostatic swather. In Fort Vermillion (where he experienced a strong sense of community), Alan worked on a farmer-drive research project through AG Canada as a research expert on growing crops in a Boreal environment.

While pursuing his Master’s degree in soil hydrology from the University of Saskatchewan, Alan spent weekends driving a hydrostatic swather on local farms. Upon completion of his graduate studies, Alan worked as an agriculture research expert in Fort Vermillion, where he was also volunteer fireman. When his son was born, members of the farming, Mennonite and Métis communities in the area held a party in the town hall for Alan and his young family. He currently [2015] works for the provincial department of agriculture in Alberta.

Alan Efetha, arrived from Kenya, 1984. Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 [14.05.25AE].

While pursuing his Master’s degree in soil hydrology from the University of Saskatchewan, Alan spent weekends driving a hydrostatic swather on local farms. Upon completion of his graduate studies, Alan worked as an agriculture research expert in Fort Vermillion, where he was also volunteer fireman. When his son was born, members of the farming, Mennonite and Métis communities in the area held a party in the town hall for Alan and his young family. He currently [2015] works for the provincial department of agriculture in Alberta.

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Pier 21

Pier 21 is a National Historic Site which was the gateway to Canada for one million immigrants between 1928 and 1971. It also served as the departure point for 500,000 Canadian Military personnel during the Second World War. Today, Pier 21 hosts the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21—Atlantic Canada’s only national museum!

https://pier21.ca/home/