15 Results:

Electri-city

Electri-city School Program

Program Description

Through exploration with circuit blocks, students will design and build series and parallel circuits, including the addition of switches and various devices. They will also learn to assess the differences in these circuits, and draw circuit diagrams. Students will then use multimeters to explore how voltage is affected when additional loads are added in different types of circuits.  As they wire miniature houses, they will experiment with various electrical devices (i.e., a light bulb, fan, and doorbell) and have an opportunity to measure electrical current, potential difference, and resistance at various points in their circuits.

Curriculum Links

ONTARIO QUEBEC
Grade 9 Academic Science - Physics – The Characteristics of Electricity

Applied Science - Physics – Electrical Applications
Secondary Cycle 2 Science and Technology – Material World

Please see the following document for more detailed curriculum links:

Ontario Quebec

Teacher Resources

Before and after your museum visit, consult these activities – specially designed to extend learning in the classroom!

RELATED ACTIVITIES TO DO IN THE CLASSROOM (PDF, 114 KB)

Curriculum-linked scavenger hunt activity. Please download and print the activity booklets before your visit to the museum.

RELATED ACTIVITIES TO DO IN THE MUSEUM (PDF, 848 KB)

ANSWERS (PDF, 211 KB)

Teacher Tips

Make name tags to help the museum educator build rapport with students. Students may bring a lunch or purchase one from the museum’s café.

Teachers may preview the museum free of charge at any time, by presenting proof of their teaching status at the admission desk.

Consider familiarizing your group with our site by downloading a PDF document and PowerPoint presentation available below.

DOWNLOAD INFORMATION FOR PLANNING YOUR VISIT (ZIP, 6 MB)

Fees

$9 per student.
Includes Museum admission.
A minimum fee of $135 will be charged per group.

Canada Science and Technology Museum
Grade Level:
Grade 9 (Ontario)
Secondary Cycle 2 (Quebec)
Fee
$9 per student
Duration
75 minutes
Dates Offered
September through May
Max Group Size
30
Program Location
At the Museum

Electri-city

Electri-city School Program

Program Description

Discover how our houses are wired, allowing us to control various devices independently in different rooms. Through various hands-on electricity experiments, students will explore electrically conductive and insulating materials, and will learn the parts of an electrical circuit. In addition, they will discover the differences between series and parallel circuits. As they wire our miniature houses, students will observe as various electrical devices (i.e., a light bulb, fan, doorbell, etc.) transform electrical energy into another form of energy.

Curriculum Links

ONTARIO QUEBEC
Grade 6 Science and Technology – Electricity and Electrical Devices Elementary Cycle 3 Science and Technology – Material World (Energy)

Please see the following document for more detailed curriculum links:

Ontario Quebec

Teacher Resources

Before and after your museum visit, consult these activities – specially designed to extend learning in the classroom!

RELATED ACTIVITIES TO DO IN THE CLASSROOM (PDF, 114 KB)

Curriculum-linked scavenger hunt activity. Please download and print the activity booklets before your visit to the museum.

RELATED ACTIVITIES TO DO IN THE MUSEUM (PDF, 848 KB)

ANSWERS (PDF, 211 KB)

Teacher Tips

Make name tags to help the museum educator build rapport with students. Students may bring a lunch or purchase one from the museum’s café.

Teachers may preview the museum free of charge at any time, by presenting proof of their teaching status at the admission desk.

Consider familiarizing your group with our site by downloading a PDF document and PowerPoint presentation available below.

DOWNLOAD INFORMATION FOR PLANNING YOUR VISIT (ZIP, 6 MB)

Fees

$9 per student.
Includes Museum admission.
A minimum fee of $135 will be charged per group.

Canada Science and Technology Museum
Grade Level:
Grade 5 - Grade 6 (Ontario)
Elementary Cycle 3 (Quebec)
Fee
$9 per student
Duration
75 minutes
Dates Offered
September to May
Max Group Size
30
Program Location
At the Museum

Everyday Energy

Everyday Energy School Program

Program Description

This program allows students to observe how their own energy can be converted into movement. They will also investigate how various forms of energy can be used to power everyday devices. As a hands-on case study, students explore the effect of a dam’s height, and observe how energy from falling water can be converted into the energy to light up an LED bulb.

Curriculum Links

ONTARIO QUEBEC
Grade 1 Science and Technology –
Understanding Matter and Energy:
Energy in Our Lives
Elementary Cycle 2 Science and Technology –
Material World: Energy;
Earth and Space: Energy

Please see the following document for more detailed curriculum links:

Ontario  Québec

Teacher Tips

Make name tags to help the museum educator build rapport with students. Students may bring a lunch or purchase one from the museum’s café.

Teachers may preview the museum free of charge at any time, by presenting proof of their teaching status at the admission desk.

Consider familiarizing your group with our site by downloading a PDF document and PowerPoint presentation available below.

DOWNLOAD INFORMATION FOR PLANNING YOUR VISIT (ZIP, 6 MB)

Fees

$9 per student.
Includes Museum admission.
A minimum fee of $135 will be charged per group.

Canada Science and Technology Museum
Grade Level:
Grade 1 - Grade 3 (Ontario)
Elementary Cycle 1 - Elementary Cycle 2 (Quebec)
Fee
$9 per student
Duration
60 minutes
Max Group Size
30
Program Location
At the Museum

Energy

Energy Educational Activity Kit

We need energy for everything we do. It’s what makes cars drive and airplanes fly, computers run and lights turn on. We need it to cook our food and to keep warm in the winter.

Teach Grade 1 students about renewable and non-renewable sources of energy and about energy’s different forms with this Energy educational activity kit. Through activities, worksheets, games, and experiments, students learn that:

  • certain objects use energy, like electricity, to help accomplish many tasks
  • living and non-living things get their energy from the sun’s heat and light
  • energy can be neither created nor destroyed
  • energy can be transformed from one form into another
  • wind and sun are powerful sources of energy

This kit includes resources to help your students: 

  • learn Grade 1 science and technology curriculum
  • develop literacy and comprehension skills
  • reinforce math skills like estimation and pattern completion
  • enjoy the arts by creating a musical instrument
Canada Agriculture and Food Museum
Grade Level:
Grade 1 (Ontario)
Elementary Cycle 1 (Quebec)
Program Location
At Your School
Online

Physics of Energy

Physics of Energy

Energy is defined as the “ability to do work, which is the ability to exert a force causing displacement of an object.” Despite this confusing definition, its meaning is very simple: energy is just the force that causes things to move.

Energy is divided into two types: potential and kinetic. The best way to think about them is that potential energy occurs before an action, and kinetic energy happens during an action. Imagine you are holding your physics textbook up in the air. It has the potential to drop, just because of its high position. If you let the textbook drop, the potential energy is converted into kinetic energy – the energy in the movement itself.

How it works

Energy comes in many different forms. Some of the more familiar forms include:

  • mechanical energy: the moving force behind machinery
  • chemical energy: derived from anything that undergoes chemical reactions to provide us with heat or sustenance, such as wood, coal, oil, food, etc.
  • muscular energy: derived from the chemical energy of the food we eat
  • thermal energy: converted from heat, such as the steam in a steam engine or heat of exploding gases in a combustion engine
  • light energy: some organisms, mostly plants, derive their energy from the sun in a process called photosynthesis
  • electrical energy: an electric charge associated with power, magnets, and electrical currents
  • nuclear energy: energy released by atoms and converted to heat, then to electrical energy

Arguably, the most important law to keep in mind when studying the transfer of energy is the Law of Conservation of Energy. Simply put, there is a finite amount of energy in the world, so none can ever be created nor destroyed. This means that when something loses energy, it cannot truly disappear; instead, it gets transferred to something else.

However, something to keep in mind is that no transfer of energy is 100 per cent efficient. Some energy will always be lost as heat and sound.

Why it matters

When considering the significance of energy, the most important question to ask is, “Which process on Earth doesn’t involve energy?” Energy is present all around us – even in us – all the time.

Energy drives every form of movement. Walking, running, and biking use chemical energy – derived from the food we eat – to fuel our muscles and keep us moving. Trains use either electrical energy, or a combination of thermal and chemical energy, generated from fossil fuels. A sailboat uses mechanical energy, as it is pushed by the wind. Just like wind energy can push a sailboat, the wind’s mechanical energy can also be converted into electrical energy using a wind turbine.

Although we have understood the many aspects of the physics of energy for a long time, humans are still trying to create better and more efficient processes to harness and use energy!

A Canadian connection

In Nova Scotia, Canada has its only operational tidal station in the Bay of Fundy. This station harnesses the mechanical power of the rising and falling tides to generate electricity. Canada is one of the only countries in the world to have expertise in this area! This technology still faces challenges in terms of economic and environmental impacts. However, if Canada can perfect it, the total wave energy – just one kilometer off of the coast – could meet more than double Canada’s current electricity demands!

Go further

Learn about renewable energy – energy that replenishes itself – here.

Learn about Canada’s energy use and production on the Natural Resources Canada website.

Head over to Let’s Talk Energy to learn more about energy!

Try This Out - Solar Still

Image Gallery

Canada Science and Technology Museum
Program Location
Online

Renewable Energy

Renewable Energy

Renewable energy is energy derived from the sources which are inexhaustible, or naturally replenished. As opposed to fossil fuels – which are currently used to power airplanes, many cars, heat buildings, and manufacture goods – renewable energy sources replenish themselves. Renewable energy sources include the sun, hydro (caused by flowing water, including rivers and oceans), wind, geothermal (heat from within the Earth), and biomass (burning vegetation and eating).

How it works

In most cases, people harness mechanical energy from a renewable source and transfer this energy to make electricity. There are six primary sources of renewable energy:

The Sun Solar panels capture light from the Sun, and an attached converter and a transformer convert its energy into electrical energy.
Hydro Hydraulic energy is created by the movement of water. Usually, dams are used to store hydro energy and release the right amount of water to water turbines.
Wind Wind energy is obtained from moving air. The wind spins a turbine, which sends the mechanical energy through a shaft to a generator.
Ocean (tides and ocean currents) Tidal energy generates power using reversible turbines in areas with high tide fluctuations.
Ocean currents are used to spin turbines, which may either be fully submerged or placed on the ocean surface.
Geothermal Geothermal energy comes from the heat within the Earth’s core. It is used to produce heat, which spins a turbine to generate electricity, and for residential and commercial heating in certain locations.
Biomass Biomass energy is solar energy that has been captured by vegetation and stored in a form of matter that can be used as fuel which is combusted to generate electricity.

Why it matters

Renewable energies allow us to generate electricity in a way that has a reduced impact on our environment, as they do not burn fossil fuels. However, it’s important to be aware that each of these sources face limitations; some are location specific, less efficient, or have an added environmental impact.

Efforts to develop clean, efficient, reliable, and cost-effective alternatives to fossil fuels are more important now than ever before. There is a major side effect of burning fossil fuels that is having a great impact on the planet: climate change. In the process of burning fossil fuels, carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases are added to the atmosphere. These trap in radiation from the sun, and cause the planet to warm, and the climate to change over time. Outcomes of climate change include damage to ecosystems and extreme weather events that can lead to flooding, causing danger to coastal regions.

A Canadian connection

One young Canadian who has been using solar power to change the developing world forever is Calgary-born Eden Full Goh. As a high school student, she became concerned with the fact that so many people around the world go without electricity. To tackle the problem, she created a device called the SunSaluter, which is a solar rotator that uses a very simple drip mechanism to allow a solar panel to track the sun in the sky, generating up to 30% more electricity. As a bonus, it creates 4 litres of clean water in a day! It is so low-cost and efficient that it is now being distributed throughout areas without central power, and it is transforming lives.

Want to know more?

Learn about the physics of energy here.

Explore Canada’s environmental research and policy at Environment and Climate Change Canada.

Learn about Canada’s energy use and production on the Natural Resources Canada website.

Head over to Let’s Talk Energy to learn more about energy!

Image Gallery

Canada Science and Technology Museum
Program Location
Online

Alternative Energy and Green Vehicle Technologies Edukit

Alternative Energy and Green Vehicle Technologies Edukit

Students explore the basics of electrical circuitry by examining automotive technology. Lead hands-on demonstrations that teach students about electric motors and combustion engines. Visualize how energy is recovered in hybrid-electric vehicles. Make biofuel and measure exhaust gas emissions, and discover electrochemistry as you assemble a fuel-cell vehicle.

Program Description:

This bilingual edukit was created in collaboration with Transport Canada's ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles program. It consists of four modules:

  1. Basic Electricity — Students explore basic electrical principles as they discover the benefits of the 42-volt electrical architecture in vehicles.
  2. Electric Motors and Combustion Engines — Students examine electric motors, combustion engines, and technologies designed to recover energy in hybrid-electric vehicles.
  3. Fuels and Emissions — Students make and burn a simple biofuel, measuring its exhaust-gas emissions.
  4. Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Technologies — Students assemble a fuel-cell vehicle and discover the potential that this technology has to offer in lowering emissions.

Interactive Props

  • Electrical breadboards
  • Circuit boards
  • Circuit-making materials: switches, light bulbs, buzzers, motors, resistors, and fuses
  • Multimeters
  • Hand generator
  • Steam engine working model
  • Electric generator working model
  • Demonstrators — flywheel
  • Tachometer
  • Exhaust-gas testing equipment
  • Hydrogen car working model
  • PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cells

Additional Information and Learning Aids

  • Extensive manual for teachers, including background material, templates, and lesson plans for activities
  • Packing guide

The edukit comes in a sturdy case on wheels.

Dimensions: 63 cm x 49 cm x 35 cm (25" x 20" x 14")
Weight: 20 kg (44 lbs)

Fees:

$129 for four weeks (includes outbound shipping and handling)

Reservations:

To reserve this edukit, call 1-866-442-4416 (toll-free in Canada).

For more information, contact contact@ingeniumcanada.org.

Canada Science and Technology Museum
Grade Level:
Grade 9 - Grade 12 (Ontario)
Secondary Cycle 1 - Secondary Cycle 2 (Quebec)
Fee
$129 for four weeks (includes outbound shipping and handling)
Program Location
At Your School

Energy for Tomorrow Edukit

Energy for Tomorrow Edukit

Students discover how energy is produced in today’s world. They take part in hands-on activities on the basics of electromagnetism, and conduct experiments using renewable electrical energy sources. Students learn how to read and draw a basic wiring diagram, and experiment with series and parallel circuits.

Program Description

This bilingual Edukit consists of eight modules:

  1. Energy — Explore the basic concepts of energy, such as where energy comes from, the difference between renewable and non-renewable energy sources, and energy transformation.
  2. Magnetism — Discover how magnetic fields weaken with distance, demonstrate that magnets have a north pole and a south pole, and experiment with attraction and repulsion.
  3. Discovering Electromagnetism — Create an electromagnet, and discover how the number of coils and type of core material determine an electromagnet’s strength.
  4. Faraday’s Induction Coil — Learn about Michael Faraday’s discovery of electromagnetic induction, and see how induction has become the foundation for all motors and generators used today.
  5. Assembling an Electric Motor (Class Project) — See Faraday’s induction in action. Explore the transformation of energy when powering a motor with electricity, and see how electricity is produced when turning the motor shaft.
  6. Simple Circuits — Draw circuit diagrams using the proper electrical symbols and conventions, and make circuit connections using materials supplied with this kit.
  7. Series and Parallel Circuits — Experiment with series and parallel circuits, learning the characteristics of each.
  8. The Production of Electrical Energy — Design experiments involving the production of electrical energy, using materials such as a 6-volt battery, a hand-crank generator, a wind generator, and a solar panel.

Interactive Props

  • magnets and iron filings
  • induction coil
  • electric motor
  • wind generator
  • electromagnetic kits
  • hand-crank generator
  • solar cell
  • circuit-making materials: alligator clips, single- and double-throw switches, light bulbs, and sockets

Additional Information and Learning Aids

  • extensive manual for teachers, including background material, templates, and lesson plans for activities
  • packing guide

The Edukit comes in a sturdy case on wheels.

Dimensions: 63 cm x 49 cm x 35 cm (25" x 20" x 14")
Weight: 20 kg (44 lbs.)

Fees:

$129 for four weeks (includes outbound shipping and handling)

Reservations:

To reserve this Edukit, call 1-866-442-4416 (toll-free in Canada).

For more information, contact contact@ingeniumcanada.org.

Canada Science and Technology Museum
Grade Level:
Grade 4 - Grade 6 (Ontario)
Elementary Cycle 3 (Quebec)
Fee
$129 for four weeks (includes outbound shipping and handling)
Program Location
At Your School