5 Results:

Why do we call computer glitches “bugs”?

A page from the Harvard Mark II electromechanical computer's log, featuring a dead moth that was removed from the device.
3 m
Article
Computing
Engineering & Technology
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The term “bug” is another way of saying something is wrong with our computer or software, but where did the term come from? While many attribute the reference to computer scientist Grace Hopper, this article from Curiosity explains that it dates back to Thomas Edison’s private journals.

Emerging tech: Honeybee habitats can now be inside your home

BEEcosystem
5 m
Article
Agriculture
Engineering & Technology
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A new product will soon enable novice beekeepers to keep honeybees inside their houses. The BEEcosystem is modular honeybee habitat that can be hung almost anywhere; it simply needs to be placed near a window if inside, or in a sheltered location outside. Watch a video that shows how the technology works.

The Future of Food Safety: Bacterial Detection through a Smartphone

Clumping together of Janus molecules after binding with E.coli substitute
3 m
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Engineering & Technology
Agriculture
Arts & Design
Sciences
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Researchers at MIT and the Max Planck Institute have developed a method for quick, on-site E. coli detection in food. While current food safety testing either requires days to complete or expensive equipment, this new method, paired with a smartphone and QR code, will make testing inexpensive and portable. The new detection process uses Janus emulsions, droplets consisting of two hemispheres of different densities. In water, the less dense, hydrocarbon hemisphere sits above the denser hemisphere

Heritage Minutes: Avro Arrow

Avro Arrow
1 m
Engineering & Technology
Military
Aviation
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The Avro Arrow –a triumph of aerospace achievement in Canadian history. Launched in 1953, the Avro Arrow project was innovative for the times as the most advanced and fastest interceptor aircraft.

Seaweed: From superfood to superconductor

Seaweed: From superfood to superconductor
Article
Engineering & Technology
Arts & Design
Sciences
Earth & Environment
Health & Wellness
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Seaweed, an edible algae with a long history in Atlantic Canada (e.g. dulse seaweed) and some Asian cuisines, could turn out to be an essential ingredient in another trend: the development of more sustainable ways to power our devices. Researchers are using a seaweed-derived material to replace traditional non-renewable carbon materials to help boost the performance of superconductors, lithium-ion batteries and fuel cells in a sustainable way.