4 Results:

Emerging tech: Bacteria-based sensors could detect pipeline leaks

pipeline
3 m
Article
Engineering & Technology
Earth & Environment
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Petroleum pipeline leaks are costly – for business and for the environment. Researchers are now developing bacteria-based sensors to detect hydrocarbons released by a leak – and emit a wireless alert signal to technicians.

The Future of Food Safety: Bacterial Detection through a Smartphone

Clumping together of Janus molecules after binding with E.coli substitute
3 m
Article
Engineering & Technology
Agriculture
Arts & Design
Sciences
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Researchers at MIT and the Max Planck Institute have developed a method for quick, on-site E. coli detection in food. While current food safety testing either requires days to complete or expensive equipment, this new method, paired with a smartphone and QR code, will make testing inexpensive and portable. The new detection process uses Janus emulsions, droplets consisting of two hemispheres of different densities. In water, the less dense, hydrocarbon hemisphere sits above the denser hemisphere

Collection Highlights: Avro Canada CF-105 Arrow 2

Avro Canada CF-105 Arrow 2
2 m
Article
Engineering & Technology
Military
Aviation
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Intended to replace the Avro Canada CF-100, the CF-105 Arrow was a technical masterpiece at the forefront of aviation engineering during its time. The Canadian government believed, however, that the manned bomber threat was diminishing and that air defence could be better handled by unmanned BOMARC missiles. The contract was cancelled on February 20, 1959 while test flying was still in progress. By then five Arrows had flown. The government ordered all completed Arrows, related documentation

Seaweed: From superfood to superconductor

Seaweed: From superfood to superconductor
Article
Engineering & Technology
Arts & Design
Sciences
Earth & Environment
Health & Wellness
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Seaweed, an edible algae with a long history in Atlantic Canada (e.g. dulse seaweed) and some Asian cuisines, could turn out to be an essential ingredient in another trend: the development of more sustainable ways to power our devices. Researchers are using a seaweed-derived material to replace traditional non-renewable carbon materials to help boost the performance of superconductors, lithium-ion batteries and fuel cells in a sustainable way.