3 Results:

Why do we call computer glitches “bugs”?

A page from the Harvard Mark II electromechanical computer's log, featuring a dead moth that was removed from the device.
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Computing
Engineering & Technology
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The term “bug” is another way of saying something is wrong with our computer or software, but where did the term come from? While many attribute the reference to computer scientist Grace Hopper, this article from Curiosity explains that it dates back to Thomas Edison’s private journals.

Researching the untold story of Canada’s keypunch girls

uOttawa's first computer
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Engineering & Technology
Social Science & Culture
Computing
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Last summer, the Canada Science and Technology Museum offered up access to its collection so that researcher Jennifer Thivierge could study “keypunch girls” — the women who punched holes in data cards and fed them into machines or tabulators, starting in the 1950s. The University of Ottawa’s Gazette writes about her findings, and what they say about gender discrimination within the field of computer science.

The Future of Food Safety: Bacterial Detection through a Smartphone

Clumping together of Janus molecules after binding with E.coli substitute
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Engineering & Technology
Agriculture
Arts & Design
Sciences
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Researchers at MIT and the Max Planck Institute have developed a method for quick, on-site E. coli detection in food. While current food safety testing either requires days to complete or expensive equipment, this new method, paired with a smartphone and QR code, will make testing inexpensive and portable. The new detection process uses Janus emulsions, droplets consisting of two hemispheres of different densities. In water, the less dense, hydrocarbon hemisphere sits above the denser hemisphere