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Travel through this artwork by clicking on the coloured triangles to learn about great Canadian social innovation stories. On your journey you can participate in social impact activities and collect clues to decode a secret message to receive a special reward.

Curious? Get started now by clicking on the red triangle first.

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Drawing of a sleeping bag

Poverty: Sleeping Bag

Canadians did not invent the sleeping bag, but they have contributed to its evolution and design over the years. James W. Woods, an entrepreneur and leader in this field, founded Woods Manufacturing Co. The company was recognized as a producer of quality outdoor supplies, including sleeping bags, for lumbermen in the Ottawa Valley. Famous Canadians including Joseph B. Tyrell, a noted geologist who discovered the dinosaur bones in Alberta’s Badlands, and Laurie Skreslet, the first Canadian to reach the summit of Mount Everest, praised Woods for the warmth preserved by the sleeping bags in the harshest of climates.

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Photo of a sleeping bag

Poverty: Sleeping Bag

Sleeping bags can be found on many Canadian streets at night. For people living in poverty and who are homeless, a sleeping bag provides warmth and protection from cold winters. In sub-zero climates, sleeping bags help prevent frostbite for those fortunate enough to have one. Homelessness and poverty are an ongoing challenge in communities across Canada. While many groups in Canada and around the world are working to put an end to the harsh realities our fellow citizens face, poverty and homelessness continue to be real challenges impacting children and youth, men and women.

Activity

Design a community that provides shelter for everyone. What does it look like? What does it include and why? Is there anything we can start to do today to build this community where we live?

Share your design with us on social media using #KindInnovation and #Ingenium.

Code Piece #1

3, 18, 5

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Drawing of a wheel

Equality with Dignity: Bicycle

Canada's premier cycle maker, Canada Cycle and Motor Company (CCM), began building bikes for all kinds of users from recreational riders and racers, to children and commuters. The company gained a reputation for building high-quality bicycles, offering a full range of accessories and replacement parts and providing local servicing. During the Depression and the Second World War, when personal automobile ownership was discouraged and gasoline was very expensive, many Canadians, including women newly employed in war industries, used bicycles to get to and from their jobs. For these people, bicycles were a means of transportation and a way to have independence and personal mobility to participate in community and family life.

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Photo of bycicles

Equality with Dignity: Bicycle

Today, bicycles are considered to be a healthy, environmentally friendly, inclusive and affordable way to help people get to where they are going – including work, school, and social events. As an equalizing means of transportation, many community groups are also building and refurbishing bicycles for people who need an affordable way to travel in their communities and beyond.

Activity

Design your dream bike. What features does it have? Where would you like to go for a ride with it?

Share your design with us on social media using #KindInnovation and #Ingenium.

Code Piece #2

1, 20, 5

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Drawing of wheat

Hunger: Marquis Wheat

Marquis wheat was developed in 1904 by Canadian scientist Charles Saunders at the Central Experimental Farm in Ottawa, finishing work begun by his father and brother. Marquis wheat produced a high-quality grain that also matured earlier and thus could be grown farther north. By 1920, it made up 90 percent of Canada’s wheat production. The introduction of Marquis wheat is a significant milestone in Canadian crop-breeding and agriculture. Charles Saunders received many honours and was knighted by King George V in 1934 for his contribution to agriculture.

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Photo of wheat

Hunger: Marquis Wheat

Earlier ripening, climate-resilient Marquis wheat accelerated the expansion of wheat cultivation across western Canada. Today, as we continue to face challenges including hunger and food insecurity, agricultural innovation like Marquis wheat serve as inspiration for continued creative thinking to address these challenges and others. Regarded by many as “The Breadbasket of the World,” Canada has a significant role to play in the future of food security.

Activity

Design a project or innovation that addresses food insecurity in your community.

Share it on social media using #FeedTheCity and #Ingenium.

Code Piece #3

27, 25, 15

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Drawing of a buoy

Environment & Animals: The Metocean Buoy

The Metocean Drifting Buoy was part of an innovative worldwide buoy system developed in the 1970s and 1980s. One of the more robust and successful models was developed in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia by Metocean Data Systems LTD. The moored buoys are dropped into the ocean to gather sea-level meteorological data and relay the information to satellites as they float back to shore. The buoys replace the need for weather ships, reducing pollution and enhancing the quality of the data collected by allowing for many more data points from a much larger surface area.

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Photo of a buoy

Environment & Animals: The Metocean Buoy

Measuring changes in the environment is critical to understanding climate change patterns and impact, but establishing trends and accurate measurements takes time. This is why the Metocean buoy is considered to be a key innovation in understanding climate change and considering solutions to address the resulting impacts on environmental ecosystems, animals and humans.

Activity

If you could design solutions to monitor and help ecosystems, animals and humans adapt to and address climate change, what would you design?

Share your idea on social media using #KindIsGreen and #Ingenium.

Code Piece #4

21, 18, 27

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Drawing of cobalt machine

Health: Theratron Junior
(also known as the “Cobalt Machine”)

Dr. Harold E. Johns was a Canadian medical physicist noted for his extensive contributions to the use of ionizing radiation to treat cancer. In 1949, Dr. Johns asked the National Research Council to manufacture cobalt-60 isotopes for use in a cobalt therapy machine prototype. By 1951, Dr. Johns’ group, along with another in London, Ontario tested Cobalt 60 on patients. Dr. Johns and Sylvia Fedoruk studied the early machines and developed the world standard for this type of treatment, which uses radioactive isotopes of cobalt to treat malignant tumours using gamma radiation from cobalt mounted in a cobalt bomb that is directed at the tumour site.

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Photo of cobalt machine

Health: Theratron Junior
(also known as the “Cobalt Machine”)

Canada is a world leader in nuclear medicine, which is still used today to treat many forms of cancer around the world. However, less known is the story of Canada’s generosity in providing the Cobalt Junior to rural communities and developing countries. Today, many Canadian medical professionals and students go around the world with groups like Team Broken Earth and Medicins Sans Frontiers to provide medical services and expertise to communities that need it.

Activity

What medical innovation do you love the most? If you could work on finding a cure to a medical problem, what would you work on, and what would you do?

Share your favourite medical invention with us on social media using #ImpactHealth and #Ingenium.

Code Piece #5

15, 23, 14

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Drawing of math model

The Coxeter Math Models

The Coxeter math models were inspired by Canadian geometer Harold Scott MacDonald "Donald" Coxeter. Dr. Coxeter is considered to be the most influential geometers of the 20th century. His work in the field of geometry, including his math models, continues to provide inspiration to the fields of mathematics, science, art, music, architecture and crystallography. He won numerous prizes for his work and was made a Companion of the Order of Canada in 1997.

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Photo of math model

The Coxeter Math Models

Today, basic education continues to be unavailable in many communities. Education is fundamental to empowering all people to achieve their dreams and be active citizens. Beautiful geometric math models are often used to teach geometry and math to young children across Canada, creating a foundation for greater learning, curiosity and appreciation for the inspiring world we live in.

Activity

Sharing what we know and learning from each other is a way to gain knowledge and a better awareness of how each of us understands the world we live in. For this challenge, ask a friend, family member or neighbour to teach you something new – and don’t forget to teach them something too! Use your curiosity to inspire you!

Share what you have learned with us on social media using #KindIsSmart and #Ingenium.

Code Piece #6

27, 9, 13

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Drawing of charged device

Peace Justice Human Rights: The Charge-Coupled Device (CCD)

The Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) was co-invented by Canadian physicist Willard S. Boyle in 1969. A CCD transforms light patterns into electrical signals that can be digitized and processed by a computer. In 1975, the CCD was used to build the first digital camera; today it can be found in almost all areas of photography, including medical and scientific applications. Boyle co-won the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physics for the CCD sensor and was appointed as a Companion of the Order of Canada.

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Photo of charged device

Peace Justice Human Rights: The Charge-Coupled Device (CCD)

Today, digital photography has proven to be an incredible force in the fight for human rights, justice and peace. Incredible images shared around the world in media and social platforms have changed the course of history, activated citizen engagements and served as evidence of lived experiences. Pictures have the capacity to convey powerful messages, human suffering and triumphs and stories that need no words. This means that every individual with a digital camera has the potential to create positive change wherever they are.

Activity

If you could take a picture to promote peace, justice and human rights what would it be? Try drawing it or actually taking the picture. Share it on social media using #BigImpact and #Ingenium.

Code Piece #7

16, 1

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Drawing of a sitski

Innovation and Creativity: The Sitski

The sit-ski was designed to enable people who have use of their upper body and arms but have lower limb disabilities the opportunity to ski. A sit-ski is a chair-like mechanism attached to one or two skis. The design of the SASKI kneeler sit-ski allows the user to propel themselves forward using only their upper body and arms for balance while they sit on a supportive frame. Various versions exist depending on the type of sport, with para-alpine and para-nordic skiing being the most recognized. Sit-skis are as unique as each user and are often customized to fit the user’s needs based on his or her level of ability and type of impairment, the particular sport practiced and the environmental conditions. SASKI Skiing for Disabled is a Canadian leader in sit-ski design and production. The company has developed a kneeling sit-ski based on recommendations from various users, including Paralympian Colette Bourgonje and SASKI volunteers.

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Photo of a sitski

Innovation and Creativity: The Sitski

Outdoor activity is entrenched in the Canadian experience and is something that everyone should have the opportunity to enjoy. However, the majority of outdoor and sporting equipment is designed with able-bodied users in mind and is not easily adapted for people with disabilities. Canadian innovators are behind some of the most creative approaches to adapting and designing equipment for use by people with disabilities. Examples include the SASKI sit-ski, the Icon Explore handcycle designed by outdoor enthusiast Christian Bagg, and the High Roller climbing rig designed by rock climber Brad Zdanivsky). In each case, it took boldness, tenacity and imagination to build, test and refine these technologies, which now give their users access to the great outdoors.

Activity

Learn about an organization that is involved in developing or supporting the creation of more accessible experiences for people with disabilities. Once you have done your research, help raise awareness for this innovation by creating a social media post about an adaptive technology you find interesting and why.

Be sure to tag an organization working or promoting this innovation and use #ImpactInnovation and #Ingenium.

Code Piece #8

3, 20

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Drawing of kind village and eepmon mural

Kind Village

At Kind Village, we believe that each and every individual has the ability to create positive social and environmental changes wherever they go. Now that you have discovered all 8 social innovation stories hidden in the mural, you can apply the code pieces you have collected to uncover the secret message and win a special prize designed just for you by eepmon.

Code Pieces

Code Key

  • A=1
  • B=2
  • C=3
  • D=4
  • E=5
  • F=6
  • G=7
  • H=8
  • I=9
  • J=10
  • K=11
  • L=12
  • M=13
  • N=14
  • O=15
  • P=16
  • Q=17
  • R=18
  • S=29
  • T=20
  • U=21
  • V=22
  • W=23
  • X=24
  • Y=25
  • Z=26
  • Space = 27

Solve

Incorrect, please try again!

Great work!

Preview of colouring graphic reward
Colouring graphic preview

At Kind Village (linked to our website), we believe that each and every individual has the ability to create positive social and environmental changes wherever they go. Now that you have discovered all 8 social innovation stories hidden in the mural, you can apply the code pieces you have collected to uncover the secret message and win a special prize designed just for you by eepmon.

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