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Why do we call computer glitches “bugs”?

A page from the Harvard Mark II electromechanical computer's log, featuring a dead moth that was removed from the device.
3 m
Article
Computing
Engineering & Technology
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The term “bug” is another way of saying something is wrong with our computer or software, but where did the term come from? While many attribute the reference to computer scientist Grace Hopper, this article from Curiosity explains that it dates back to Thomas Edison’s private journals.

Take a virtual reality tour of Anne Frank’s house

An image of Anne Frank
1 m
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Engineering & Technology
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You don’t need to travel all the way to Amsterdam to see the Anne Frank House. The museum recently launched a 25-minute virtual reality tour that takes you through the rooms—hidden behind an Amsterdam canal-side house—where Anne wrote her diary. Read the full article and watch a trailer for the virtual reality tour.

Emerging tech: Bacteria-based sensors could detect pipeline leaks

pipeline
3 m
Article
Engineering & Technology
Earth & Environment
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Petroleum pipeline leaks are costly – for business and for the environment. Researchers are now developing bacteria-based sensors to detect hydrocarbons released by a leak – and emit a wireless alert signal to technicians.

How the Canada Science and Technology Museum designed an accessible, modular headphone jack | Innovation150

Accessible headphone jack
5 m
Article
Engineering & Technology
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Accessible headphone jacks aren’t hard to find nowadays, but they’re always built into your average neighbourhood fixtures, like an ATM. This isn’t the most welcoming design since there’s no way to get the device as a standalone product. But the Canada Science and Technology Museum strives for inclusive design, and since they couldn’t buy an accessible headphone jack, their innovators decided to design their own.

Atoms-thick layer of silicon-based semiconductor may allow us to better understand the harsh environments of Venus

Atoms-thick layer of silicon-based semiconductor may allow us to better understand the harsh environments of Venus
14 m
Article
Earth & Environment
Engineering & Technology
Space
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In 1967, Venera 4 was the 1st probe to transmit data from another planet’s atmosphere. 8 models, and close to 15 years, later we were able to receive the 1st colour panoramic views of that same planet’s surface. Today, Venus still very much remains a mystery with probes unable to withstand the extreme temperatures and atmospheric pressures for more than 127 minutes. However, researchers at Standford University’s Extreme Environment Microsystems Laboratory are working on developing an atoms-thick