4 Results:

Researching the untold story of Canada’s keypunch girls

uOttawa's first computer
3 m
Article
Engineering & Technology
Social Science & Culture
Computing
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Last summer, the Canada Science and Technology Museum offered up access to its collection so that researcher Jennifer Thivierge could study “keypunch girls” — the women who punched holes in data cards and fed them into machines or tabulators, starting in the 1950s. The University of Ottawa’s Gazette writes about her findings, and what they say about gender discrimination within the field of computer science.

The Future of Food Safety: Bacterial Detection through a Smartphone

Clumping together of Janus molecules after binding with E.coli substitute
3 m
Article
Engineering & Technology
Agriculture
Arts & Design
Sciences
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Researchers at MIT and the Max Planck Institute have developed a method for quick, on-site E. coli detection in food. While current food safety testing either requires days to complete or expensive equipment, this new method, paired with a smartphone and QR code, will make testing inexpensive and portable. The new detection process uses Janus emulsions, droplets consisting of two hemispheres of different densities. In water, the less dense, hydrocarbon hemisphere sits above the denser hemisphere

Bloodhound Diary: Learning from the past

An image of the Bloodhound SSC rocket car
Article
Engineering & Technology
Road Transportation
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This article is written by Andy Green, the world land speed record holder, and the driver of the Bloodhound SSC; the car that will attempt to reach 1,000 mph sometime in 2018. In this article, Green gives a quick overview of the engineering work that's been done so far as they design the car that will push the limits.

Seaweed: From superfood to superconductor

Seaweed: From superfood to superconductor
Article
Engineering & Technology
Arts & Design
Sciences
Earth & Environment
Health & Wellness
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Seaweed, an edible algae with a long history in Atlantic Canada (e.g. dulse seaweed) and some Asian cuisines, could turn out to be an essential ingredient in another trend: the development of more sustainable ways to power our devices. Researchers are using a seaweed-derived material to replace traditional non-renewable carbon materials to help boost the performance of superconductors, lithium-ion batteries and fuel cells in a sustainable way.