7 Results:

Researching the untold story of Canada’s keypunch girls

uOttawa's first computer
3 m
Article
Engineering & Technology
Social Science & Culture
Computing
Share
Last summer, the Canada Science and Technology Museum offered up access to its collection so that researcher Jennifer Thivierge could study “keypunch girls” — the women who punched holes in data cards and fed them into machines or tabulators, starting in the 1950s. The University of Ottawa’s Gazette writes about her findings, and what they say about gender discrimination within the field of computer science.

Science Odyssey - Ten days of discovery and innovation

Science Odyssey is Canada's largest celebration of science, technology, engineering and mathematics
1 m
Article
Engineering & Technology
Arts & Design
Share
Science Odyssey is Canada's largest celebration of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, featuring fun and inspiring experiences in museums, research centres, laboratories and classrooms from coast to coast. Powered by NSERC, Science Odyssey demonstrates how discoveries and innovations shape our daily lives and foster a strong science culture in Canada.

Decoding the Dance of the Honey Bee, in Real-Time

Honey bees
3 m
Article
Engineering & Technology
Agriculture
Sciences
Share
Since the deciphering of the honey bee ‘waggle’ in the 1920’s by Karl von Frisch, researchers have been measuring the dance-like form of communication that allows bees to convey direction and distance to a food source. While this observation process was initially manual and time-consuming – requiring humans, protractors, and stopwatches – techniques have evolved with technology. Recently, a team from the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at the Free University of Berlin, Germany

Bloodhound Diary: Learning from the past

An image of the Bloodhound SSC rocket car
Article
Engineering & Technology
Road Transportation
Share
This article is written by Andy Green, the world land speed record holder, and the driver of the Bloodhound SSC; the car that will attempt to reach 1,000 mph sometime in 2018. In this article, Green gives a quick overview of the engineering work that's been done so far as they design the car that will push the limits.

Microsoft AI Masters "Ms. Pac-Man"

An artists impression of a neural network.
7 m
Article
Engineering & Technology
Computing
Share
Have you ever played Ms. Pac-Man? If so... have you played over 3000 rounds of it? Because that's how long it took for a Microsoft Artificially Intelligent program called Maluuba to learn how to get the highest possible score in the game, 999999. Check out how it did it... and don't worry, there's no worry of this AI taking over the world.

A New Take on the Robotic Arm: Tentacles

The robotic arm grasping a smooth metal tube.
5 m
Article
Engineering & Technology
Share
Engineers are constantly taking cues from nature when designing new technologies, and the robotic tentacle arm created by German robotics company, Festo, is a great example.